Washington’s 2016 Forest Health Highlights

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources and USDA Forest Service conduct annual aerial surveys to identify, map and monitor the impacts of insect and diseases on forest lands throughout the state. Aerial survey data are verified with ground-based observations and are compared against the results of other forest health research happening throughout the state. Survey results are compiled … Continue reading Washington’s 2016 Forest Health Highlights

Potential for Douglas-fir Beetle Outbreaks in Eastern Washington

Several windthrow events in 2015 have paved the way for a potential outbreak of Douglas-fir beetle in areas of eastern Washington this spring (2017). The Douglas-fir beetle is a bark beetle that normally breeds in felled, injured, windthrown or root-diseased Douglas-fir. It may also attack western larch, but can only produce brood in downed trees. … Continue reading Potential for Douglas-fir Beetle Outbreaks in Eastern Washington

Reporting Drought Related Tree Damage – Why and How?

In the November 2016 issue of Small Forest Landowner News, DNR Forest Entomologist Glenn Kohler reported on the impacts to conifers following the 2015 drought. This period of drought was the most severe in Washington in several decades and had significant influence on the availability of water for growing trees. Lack of water caused stress … Continue reading Reporting Drought Related Tree Damage – Why and How?

Current Forest Health Conditions in Washington: A Sneak Preview

This year marks the 70th year of the annual insect and disease aerial surveys in Washington. The survey is conducted cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service and Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The survey information is collected by observers using digital navigational system-equipped airplanes flying at low altitude. The 2016 data has been … Continue reading Current Forest Health Conditions in Washington: A Sneak Preview

How to Make a Wildlife Tree

This article reprinted as it originally appeared in DNR's Forest Stewardship Notes In the forest, trees exist in many life phases simultaneously, from seedlings to giants, and then as standing dead trees (snags) and down logs. Natural forces constantly work on trees, causing them to grow, then die, crack, and rot. The individual fate of … Continue reading How to Make a Wildlife Tree

Gypsy Moth Catches Down, No Catches in Areas Treated this Spring

The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has caught 25 gypsy moths during its annual trapping, down from the 42 moths caught in 2015. Beginning this past June, WSDA placed more than 30,000 orange triangle-shaped traps on trees throughout the state to monitor for gypsy moths. The traps contained a pheromone lure to attract male … Continue reading Gypsy Moth Catches Down, No Catches in Areas Treated this Spring