• Resiliency in the urban and community forest comes from planting the best tree in the best site possible, then taking care of it. But in a steadily warming climate, how do we know we are selecting the best tree? Chicago Botanic Garden recently published a list of trees that were analyzed and found to be resilient enough to thrive under worst-case warming scenarios through the year 2050. The bottom line? Diversity of the tree population is important, in order to overcome potential threats to the community forest.
  • How can trees improve the health and livability of neighborhoods? One way is by providing a local food source for residents. Over 90% of Americans live in urban areas but have limited access to fresh and healthy food. By planting fruit and nut trees, it is possible to provide fresh food for communities. AC Trees new Community Groves program is designed to assist neighborhoods in achieving that goal.
  • National Wildlife Federation’s Trees for Wildlife provides adult leaders with fun, hands-on science-based activities to help young people learn about the importance of trees and how to plant and take care of trees for the future. Groups and organizations can apply to receive free trees to plant in your community. Planting trees is a great way for youth to get involved and give back to their community.
  • Forwarded from a twitter account: 2000 years old tree in South Africa, known as Tree of Life