Urban particulate air pollution is a serious health concern. A recent study by the US Forest Service found that trees can remove fine particles from the air we breath.

In the first effort to estimate the overall impact of a city’s urban forest on concentrations of fine particulate pollution (particulate matter less than 2.5 microns, or PM2.5), a U.S. Forest Service and Davey Institute study found that urban trees and forests are saving an average of one life every year per city. In New York City, trees save an average of eight lives every year.

Fine particulate air pollution can contribute to premature mortality, pulmonary inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, and altered cardiac functions. In their study, researchers David Nowak and Robert Hoehn of the U.S. Forest Service and Satoshi Hirabayashi and Allison Bodine of the Davey Institute in Syracuse, N.Y., estimated how much fine particulate matter is removed by trees in 10 cities, their impact on PM2.5 concentrations and associated values and impacts on human health.  

Read the US Forest Service Northern Research Station news release. Or read the published study.